Last edited by Gardataur
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of BUDDHIST MONASTERIES AND FOUR MONEY-RAISING INSTITUTIION IN CHINESE HISTORY found in the catalog.

BUDDHIST MONASTERIES AND FOUR MONEY-RAISING INSTITUTIION IN CHINESE HISTORY

LIEN-SHENG YANG

BUDDHIST MONASTERIES AND FOUR MONEY-RAISING INSTITUTIION IN CHINESE HISTORY

by LIEN-SHENG YANG

  • 257 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Online version of print publication HARVARD JOURNAL OF ASIATIC STUDIES v.13 1/2 (June 1950) : 174-191.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19462380M

  The long history of the religion's development in China makes it no easy task to present a full picture of the evolution of Buddhist chants in its adopted land; it is a subject that deserves a separate book altogether. Information on Chinese Buddhist liturgical chant and its performance can be gleaned from canonical Buddhist literature dating. Buddhism - Buddhism - The Pali canon (Tipitaka): The earliest systematic and most complete collection of early Buddhist sacred literature is the Pali Tipitaka (“Three Baskets”; Sanskrit: Tripitaka). Its arrangement reflects the importance that the early followers attached to the monastic life (Pali and Sanskrit: Vinaya), to the discourses of the Buddha (Pali: Sutta), and subsequently to.

According to official statistics, as of there were 3, active Tibetan Buddhist monasteries or temples and , Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns throughout China, far exceeding the number of Chinese Buddhist monastics and illustrating the particularly important position that religious institutions hold in Tibetan communities.2 Of these. Map 5. The structure of Tibetan history: Core regions, peripheries, and trade networks circa Graph of the growth of Buddhist temples and monasteries in core regions ca. – Map 6. The historical Tibetan world: Travel time and main trade patterns circa Table 1.

When Buddhism reached the region in the 18th century, it absorbed many of the local Shamanic beliefs. Today in Tuva there are both shaman communities and Buddhist monasteries (known as khuree). Although many temples were destroyed during the Soviet period, they are now being actively rebuilt in various districts of the republic.   Remains of Buddhist sculptures are still being worshipped as Lord Siva in all the major temples within the radius of 10 km of Nidumolu village in Movva mandal of .


Share this book
You might also like
Introduction to juristic psychology

Introduction to juristic psychology

Justice in eighteenth-century Hackney

Justice in eighteenth-century Hackney

Geothermal environmental analysis record

Geothermal environmental analysis record

Oral drug absorption

Oral drug absorption

Sharing management with the workers

Sharing management with the workers

Computer applications in agriculture

Computer applications in agriculture

Dont panic!

Dont panic!

An outline of Chinese civil law

An outline of Chinese civil law

Tiger by the tail.

Tiger by the tail.

Studies in Indian administration

Studies in Indian administration

1990 evaluation of the Teaching Company Scheme

1990 evaluation of the Teaching Company Scheme

She Shall Be Called Woman (Volume 1 Old Testament Women)

She Shall Be Called Woman (Volume 1 Old Testament Women)

Satin Vixen

Satin Vixen

Christmas 1973

Christmas 1973

BUDDHIST MONASTERIES AND FOUR MONEY-RAISING INSTITUTIION IN CHINESE HISTORY by LIEN-SHENG YANG Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buddhist Monasteries And Four Money-Raising Institutions In Chinese History in Chinese Economic History up to (2 vols) Author: Lien-Sheng Yang. The Economic Basis Of Unity And Division In Chinese History 3. China’s Economic Development In Historical Perspective Buddhist Monasteries And Four Money-Raising Institutions In Chinese Cited by: In Chinese history there are four money-raising institutions which either originated in or had close connections with Buddhist temples and monasteries.1 These four are the pawnshop, the mutual financing association, the auction sale, and the sale of lottery tickets.

Pawnshops owned by and opened in Buddhist monasteries can be traced back to the. Buddhism is a religion that was founded by Siddhartha Gautama (“The Buddha”) more than 2, years ago in India.

With about million followers, scholars consider Buddhism one of. Buddhist monasticism is one of the earliest surviving forms of organized monasticism and one of the fundamental institutions of and nuns, called bhikkhu (Pali, Skt. bhikshu) and bhikkhuni (Skt. bhikshuni), are responsible for the preservation and dissemination of the Buddha's teaching and the guidance of Buddhist lay surviving traditions of monastic discipline.

Yang, L.S., “Buddhist Monasteries and Four Money-Raising Institutions in Chinese History,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 13 (50) Yu, Chun-fang, The Renewal of Buddhism in China.

Though India is no longer a Buddhist country, Buddhism held its place among Indian faiths for nearly seventeen centuries ( D. During this long stretch of time the Buddhist monks were organized in Sanghas in most parts of the country and their activities and achievements have profoundly influenced India`s traditional s: 1.

Money-Raising Institutions in Chinese History, ” Harvar d Journal of Asiatic Stud 1/2 () – 91, here; Kogi Kudara, “ The Buddhist Culture of the Old Uigur Peoples, ”. The book aims to summarize and present the historical trajectory of the Sinification of Buddhism in a new light, revealing the symbiotic relationship between Buddhist faith and Chinese culture.

The book examines cases such as repentance, vegetarianism, charity, scriptural lecture, the act of releasing captive animals, the Bodhisattva faith, and. Buddhist Monasteries and Four Money-Raising Institutions in Chinese History in Studies in Chinese Institutional History. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Chugoku noson kanko chosa kankokai (Niida Noboru, ed.) Chugoku noson kanko chosa (Investigations of customary practices in rural China). 6 vols. Tokyo: Iwanami. The document, made available in or shortly before Augustcalls for the monastic settlement (Tibetan: gar) to be divided into two sections with a wall between them, with one section designated as an “institute” or academy with a maximum of 1, residents, who would be mainly monks, and one as a monastery with a maximum of 3, residents, mainly nuns.

The anti-Buddhist campaign of destroyed as many as four thousand monasteries and temples and confiscated large amounts of monastic land. From then onward, the imperial government exerted stronger secular control over the religious establishment and did not allow monasteries again to accumulate such tremendous amounts of wealth and land.

The government continued to place restrictions on the size of Buddhist monasteries and other institutions. According to local sources, at Larung Gar, Kardze TAP, Sichuan Province, site of the world’s largest Tibetan Buddhist institute, the government continued its program of evicting monks and nuns that began in Dumonlin, Heinrich (), A History of Zen Buddhism, New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt.

Ltd. Dumoulin, Heinrich (a), Zen Buddhism: A History. Volume 1: India and China, World Wisdom Books, ISBN ; Dumoulin, Heinrich (b), Zen Buddhism: A History.

Volume 2: Japan, World Wisdom Books, ISBN   The religious sites on the mountain were visited by several Chinese Emperors and other noted personalities of the country for centuries.

Today, the monasteries and temples on the mountain store hundreds of religious scriptures and books that reveal important facts about the history and evolution of Buddhism in China. Mount Emei. Chinese Buddhism or Han Buddhism has shaped Chinese culture in a wide variety of areas including art, politics, literature, philosophy, medicine and material culture.

The translation of a large body of Indian Buddhist scriptures into Chinese and the inclusion of these translations together with works composed in China into a printed canon had far-reaching implications for the dissemination of.

Hence, Kamakura Buddhism, as the entire religious movement is called, has left an indelible mark on Japanese history and has made Buddhism a lasting and pervasive component of Japanese culture.

Buddhism originated in India and spread to China about four centuries after the time of the historical Buddha Sākyamuni (ca. fifth to fourth century, b. Read a Section: Tibet.

China → Xinjiang → Hong Kong → Macau →. Executive Summary. The constitution of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), which cites the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the guidance of Marxism-Leninism and Mao Zedong Thought, states that citizens “enjoy freedom of religious belief,” but limits protections for religious practice to “normal.

Title: Buddhist Monasteries and Four Money-raising Institutions in Chinese History Created Date: Z. Buddhist institutions were used by the shogunate to control the country. During the Edo (–) this power was constricted, to be followed by persecutions at the beginning of the Meiji restoration (–).

Buddhist temples played a major administrative role during the Edo period, through the Danka or terauke system. Wutai Mt. is one of the four famous Holy Mountains for Chinese Buddhists (other three are Emei Mt.

in Sichuan, Jiuhua Mt. in Anhui and Putuo Mt. in Zhejiang). With over 53 sacred monasteries, it is home to many of China's most important monasteries and temples. Init was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Nalanda, ancient university and Buddhist monastic centre southwest of Bihar Sharif in central Bihar state, northeastern a’s traditional history dates to the time of the Buddha (6th–5th centuries bce) and Mahavira, the founder of the Jaina ing to a later Tibetan source, Nagarjuna (the 2nd–3rd-century ce Buddhist philosopher) began his studies there.

Tibetan Buddhist monasteries are, historically and currently, some of the most advanced centers of Buddhist scholarship and practice in the world today.

They have produced some of the world’s most inspiring, compassionate teachers and practitioners of Buddhism, the Dalai Lama and the 17th Karmapa being prime examples.

Between andtens of thousands of Buddhist sacred sites in China were destroyed, victims of targeted destruction, accidental damage, or simply neglect. During the same period, however, many of these sites were reconstructed, a process that involved both rebuilding material structures and reviving religious communities.